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  • Kirk Barbera

Enjoying Sculptures with Dianne Durante




Traveling is a big value for people today. It's one of the great benefits of being alive today. It is so easy and affordable to see the whole world. Often, we can travel places and see only the usual suspects. In this discussion I explore Dianne Durante's latest book "Getting More Enjoyment from Sculpture You love," and we discuss Dianne's work as being part of "travelogues."


Travelogues don't have to be boring lectures. They can be exhilarating and exciting new ways of seeing the world. Don't just go to NYC and see the same monuments you are "supposed to see." Try, instead, an art tour. Best of all, you can do this at your own pace and in your own way.


On this show Dianne and I discuss several sculptures, so you can see how simple her method is and how it helps anyone from any background enjoy art more deeply.

We also discuss a little bit of poetry and some ways to work with your children in seeing new art.

Special thank you to Quent Cordair Fine Art for the image of one of the sculptures they represent.


Below are some of the items we discussed on the show as well as some further recommendations and the images from the show:


Dianne's Sunday Recommendation Newsletter

Dianne's Instagram where she shares artworks

Dianne's Facebook page Forgotten Delights

Article: How to Introduce Your Kid to Art

Treasure Island by Robert Luis Stevenson, illustrated by NC Wyeth

Dream Big by Danielle Anjou

Great album by NC Wyeth brought up by Dianne



Nathan Hale by Frederick William MacMonnies, Photograph ©Dianne Durante

Nathan Hale by Frederick William MacMonnies, Photograph ©Dianne Durante

Nathan Hale by Frederick William MacMonnies, Photograph ©Dianne Durante

Nathan Hale by Bela Lyon Pratt, Photograph ©Dianne Durante

Nathan Hale by Bela Lyon Pratt (left) and Frederick William MacMonnies (right), Photograph ©Dianne Durante

Nathan Hale by Bela Lyon Pratt (left) and Frederick William MacMonnies (right), Photograph ©Dianne Durante

Nathan Hale by Frederick William MacMonnies (right), Photograph©Dianne Durante


This is a great poem that Dianne talks about in her book regarding the emotion this sculpture evokes.

Invictus BY WILLIAM ERNEST HENLEY

Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul.


Toward the end of the show Dianne shared a great poem by Henry Lawson, 1898 titled:


The Ships That Won't Go Down


We hear a great commotion 'Bout the ship that comes to grief, That founders in mid-ocean, Or is driven on a reef; Because it's cheap and brittle A score of sinners drown. But we hear but mighty little Of the ships that won't go down. Here's honour to the builders – The builders of the past; Here's honour to the builders That builded ships to last; Here's honour to the captain, And honour to the crew; Here's double-column headlines To the ships that battle through. They make a great sensation About famous men that fail, That sink a world of chances In the city morgue or gaol, Who drink, or blow their brains out, Because of "Fortune's frown". But we hear far too little Of the men who won't go down. The world is full of trouble, And the world is full of wrong, But the heart of man is noble, And the heart of man is strong! They say the sea sings dirges, But I would say to you That the wild wave's song's a paean For the men that battle through.