Surprised by Art: Man's Loss of Faith

Updated: Jun 22, 2020



Click below to join the Facebook group and VOTE on our next topic!


Welcome to the first episode of Surprised by Art, a new podcast where two art experts surprise each other (and YOU) with great works of art.


This is how it works. Each week you the audience can vote on a topic. This week you voted on the topic of "Man's Loss of Faith." Then Luc Travers will select a painting and Kirk Barbera will select a poem to surprise everyone with.


This is done primarily for an audio listening audience. You can hear them wherever you listen to podcasts. The podcast is tailored to explaining is as clear terms as possible the visuals in the painting.


Of course, we recommend that you also take a moment and look at the painting itself. We have provided an image below.

Within the audio of the podcast, we have designated a spot for you to pause and go to this post and then take a moment to read the painting on your own.


Give it a title. Doesn't matter if you are correct. Just think, what is the first word that comes to mind?


Then, give a description of everything in the painting.


In the show, we have various audience members doing exactly this, and if you listen to them this can help give you ideas on how to accomplish this investigation.


Lastly, interpretation. You can do your best on your own or listen to Luc and Kirk's exploration.


Ok here comes the painting! Remember: DO NOT WORRY ABOUT THE ARTIST'S NAME OR THE TITLE OF THE ARTWORK UNTIL AFTER YOU SEE THE PAINTING!






Check out Luc Travers' unique method for exploring paintings.

 

In the second half of the show, Luc and Kirk explore the poem Dover Beach by Mathew Arnold. Then they compare and discuss the meaning of these works in relation to the topic "Man's Loss of Faith."


Below is the poem in its entirety. Kirk does a reading and discussion of the poem on the podcast.


Dover Beach

BY MATTHEW ARNOLD


The sea is calm tonight.

The tide is full, the moon lies fair

Upon the straits; on the French coast the light

Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,

Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.

Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!

Only, from the long line of spray