The Tables Turned, An Evening Scene on the Same Subject by William Wordsworth

Updated: Dec 14, 2019




In this special episode I quote several passages from William Wordsworth's prefaces to the Lyrical Ballads and passages from C. Bradley Thompson's newest book "America's Revolutionary Mind."


My argument is that Wordsworth, in telling people to put away their books and look to Nature is reflecting a philosophical view from Isaac Newton and John Locke.

Up ! up ! my friend, and clear your looks,
Why all this toil and trouble ?
Up ! up ! my friend, and quit your books,
Or surely you’ll grow double.

There are times when we should put away our books. More importantly, there are dangers to only look in books for answers and not thinking for ourselves. Wordsworth in Lyrical Ballads and elsewhere is desperately trying to get people to look at the reality of human nature and the greater Nature that man inhabits.


This is a lesson we need now more than ever, as we are turning our backs on Man, Nature and the Right morality for living on this earth.


 

The Tables Turned;


An Evening Scene, on the Same Subject.


By William Wordsworth

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Up ! up ! my friend, and clear your looks,

Why all this toil and trouble ?

Up ! up ! my friend, and quit your books,

Or surely you’ll grow double.


The sun above the mountain’s head,

A freshening lustre mellow,

Through all the long green fields has spread,

His first sweet evening yellow.


Books! ’tis a dull and endless strife,

Come, hear the woodland linnet,

How sweet his music; on my life

There’s more of wisdom in it.


And hark ! how blithe the throstle sings !

And he is no mean preacher ;

Come forth into the light of things,

Let Nature be your teacher.