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  • Kirk Barbera

Surprised by Art #5: Romantic Spark





Not only did Luc and Kirk discuss the topic of romance, but they discussed rom-coms, read some Shakespeare, talked about literature and of course were surprised by the painting that Luc chose and the poem Kirk chose. What do you think is a romantic spark? When does it happen? How does it happen? Special thanks to our voice recording guests Patrick Reasonover of justaddfirewater.com Emily Meer from the Surprised by Art Facebook Group Hillary Romero from Hilco Homes


This podcast is a conversation one that will certainly surprise you with the inherent truths in great works of art. You do not need to be a scholar to approach these podcasts. Luc and Kirk provide approachable ways to make art more meaningful in your life.



Below is the painting chosen by Luc Travers. We recommend that you take a moment and look at the painting for yourself.

Give it a title. Doesn't matter if you are correct. Just think, what is the first word that comes to mind first?


Then, give a literal description of everything in the painting.

In the show, we have various audience members doing exactly this, and if you listen to them this can help give you ideas on how to accomplish this investigation.


Lastly, interpretation. You can do your best on your own or listen to Luc and Kirk's exploration.


Ok here comes the painting! Remember: DO NOT WORRY ABOUT THE ARTIST'S NAME OR THE TITLE OF THE ARTWORK UNTIL AFTER YOU SEE THE PAINTING!




Two Women at a Window

Painting by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo


You can view this painting with augmented reality! Visit here.



The Poem


The Good-Morrow

BY JOHN DONNE


I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I

Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?

But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?

Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?

’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.

If ever any beauty I did see,

Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee.


And now good-morrow to our waking souls,

Which watch not one another out of fear;

For love, all love of other sights controls,

And makes one little room an everywhere.

Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,

Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,

Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.


My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,

And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;

Where can we find two better hemispheres,

Without sharp north, without declining west?

Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;

If our two loves be one, or, thou and I

Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.